"I don’t believe the police, I believe the community."

Protester says as the march begins.

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She was referring to the police’s claim that 16 y/o Kimani Gray was armed when he was killed. Autopsy showed 7 gun shots, 3 in the back. 

The NYPD have arrested Kimari Gray’s 15 year old sister while her father yells “Let go of my girl! That’s my little girl!

The NYPD has declared a portion of Flastbush a “Frozen Zone”. Media are not allowed in and people can be subjected to arrest for not following police orders. The area is under temporary martial law. The last times the NYPD declared a Frozen Zone was on the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and during the beginning of OWS.

Source: anarcho-queer

(via intersectmovements)

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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Police in riot gear barricaded the streets, followed the march and searched apartment buildings in the neighborhood without warrants, looking for youths who they claimed had been throwing bottles at police from neighborhood rooftops.

(Source: , via mochente)

This is what capitalism looks like.

neverdancewiththedevil:

Two people died and 21 others were injured in Peru’s capital on October 27, as protesters clashed with police trying to shut down a sprawling wholesale market. [Reuters]

neverdancewiththedevil:

Two people died and 21 others were injured in Peru’s capital on October 27, as protesters clashed with police trying to shut down a sprawling wholesale market. [Reuters]

(Source: anonymousmilitant, via anarcho-queer)












BREAKING: Cherri Foytlin, an indigenous South Louisiana mother of six and wife of a Gulf Coast oilfield worker, has been arrested after chaining herself to the gate of a Keystone XL pipeyard. She single-handedly blocked pipe and TransCanada’s trucks in the yard for an hour. Cherri’s action is in solidarity with the Defend Our Coast actions happening across British Columbia today and all indigeno
us and frontline communities endangered by this toxic pipeline. This Louisiana resident is not stranger to the devastating impacts of Big Oil. In the Spring of 2011 she walked 1,243 miles from New Orleans to Washington D.C. as a call for action to stop the BP Drilling Disaster, has been a constant voice speaking out for the health and ecosystems of Gulf Coast communities.Read more about Cherri’s full story and updates.
BREAKING: Cherri Foytlin, an indigenous South Louisiana mother of six and wife of a Gulf Coast oilfield worker, has been arrested after chaining herself to the gate of a Keystone XL pipeyard. She single-handedly blocked pipe and TransCanada’s trucks in the yard for an hour. 

Cherri’s action is in solidarity with the Defend Our Coast actions happening across British Columbia today and all indigeno
us and frontline communities endangered by this toxic pipeline. 

This Louisiana resident is not stranger to the devastating impacts of Big Oil. In the Spring of 2011 she walked 1,243 miles from New Orleans to Washington D.C. as a call for action to stop the BP Drilling Disaster, has been a constant voice speaking out for the health and ecosystems of Gulf Coast communities.

Read more about Cherri’s full story and updates.

(via mochente)

Anglo American Platinum (Amplats), the world’s largest platinum producer, fired 12,000 striking South African miners Friday as the transnational corporations, the African National Congress government and the COSATU union federation sought to quell a growing wave of wildcat strikes. After workers had ignored the company’s demand that they appear for disciplinary hearings. Management admits that it has been unable to get more than 20 percent of its workforce to show up at their jobs and has therefore been forced to halt mining operations.


The strike wave was triggered by the walkout two months ago by platinum miners at Lonmin’s (the second-biggest platinum miner) Marikana mine demanding higher pay. The ANC government and its security forces responded to their strike, which was opposed by the NUM and COSATU, with the worst massacre since the end of the apartheid regime 18 years ago. Heavily armed police gunned down strikers, killing 34 and wounding another 78, with many of them shot in the back.


The mass firing was announced three weeks into a wildcat strike by some 28,000 miners at its four mines in Rustenberg and just a day after repeated police attacks aimed at preventing the miners from gathering for a meeting left a miners dead body in the street. Gaddhafi Mdoda, a representative of the strikers said that in addition to rubber bullets and tear gas the police fired upon the miners with live ammunition.

The strikers have grown angry over the police repression and the company’s refusal to negotiate on their demand for a 16,000 rand ($1,800) monthly wage.


The strike spread to another Amplats mine in Limpopo, South Africa’s northernmost province, some 250 miles to the north.


The refusal of the miners to go underground brought 75,000 workers in the mining sector to strike in defiance of the mining corporations, the ANC government and the official unions of COSATU and the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM). This represents 15 percent of the industry’s total workforce.


The killings, along with the arrests and brutalization of hundreds more miners, failed to break the strike, and Lonmin decided it had to end the workers’ uprising by granting the miners wage increases of up to 22 %.


From the platinum sector, the strike wave has spread to gold, iron ore, diamond and chrome mines. In virtually every case, the strikes are in defiance of low-wage contracts imposed by the mining bosses and the NUM and have therefore been declared illegal.

thepeoplesrecord:

Riot police arrest peaceful protesters rallying for striking Walmart workers
October 2, 2012

Hundreds of people gathered at a major Walmart distribution center Monday in Elwood, Illinois to stand in solidarity with workers who have been on strike since mid-September in response to unsafe working conditions and unfair wages.

“No one should come to work and endure extreme temperatures, inhale dust and chemical residue, and lift thousands of boxes weighing up to 250lbs with no support. Workers never know how long the work day will be- sometimes its two hours, sometimes its 16 hours. Injuries are common, as is discrimination against women and illegal retaliation against workers who speak up for better treatment,” Warehouse Workers for Justice states at its official website.

The discrimination aspect of this list of grievances includes widespread sexual harassment and intimidation of female warehouse workers, an epidemic largely ignored by the establishment media, even among individuals, such as the New York Times’ Nicholas Kristof, known for focusing on female worker equality and empowerment in other countries.

“When I worked at the Walmart warehouse in Elwood, I was sexually harassed on a regular basis…I literally got locked inside a trailer because that’s what the men thought I was there for…I reported it to my supervisor, but he didn’t do anything about it,” said Ulyonda Dickerson, a worker at the Walmart warehouse in Elwood, in a report released by Warehouse Workers for Justice.

“I told the supervisors about it, but they definitely don’t listen. One supervisor I had tried to tell said, ‘I didn’t see that.’ Just because you didn’t see it, doesn’t mean it didn’t happen,” said Samantha Rodriguez, another Elwood warehouse employee, in the same report. “When I went to another supervisor about the harassment, he asked me out on a date. I said no, and eventually I got fired.”

In response to Monday’s peaceful protester, riot police from Will County and Elwood were unleashed on the crowd, and witnesses tweeted a series of disturbing photos, including officers in full riot regalia (face shields, clubs, body armor,) and what appears to be a Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) vehicle.

There was some confusion about the police’s jurisdiction on Twitter with individuals speculating the officers were private police given their “paramilitary” appearance.

Photos from the protest show officers restraining some protesters with zip-ties after police declared the event an “unlawful assembly.” Ultimately, 17 peaceful protesters were arrested, and activists sang “We Shall Overcome” as they were cuffed and walked to a police transport unit.

Elwood police Chief Fred Hayes said, “Police officers always have to prepare for the worst thing that could possibly happen.”

Among those arrested were Will County Board member Jackie Traynere, the Rev. Craig Purchase of Mount Zion Tabernacle Church in Joliet, the Rev. Raymond Lescher of Sacred Heart Church in Joliet and Charlotte Droogan, lay minister at Universalist Unitarian Church of Joliet, Southtown Star reports.

Mike Compton, one of the striking warehouse workers who walked off the job, said after working at the warehouse for three months, he was a veteran worker because the turnover is so high. He said everyone quits because “They call us bodies and that’s what we feel like.”

Wal-Mart, famous for union-busting and employee abuse, is heavily subsidized by the state i.e. U.S. taxpayers with many of its employees relying on food stamps and state-run health insurance for survival.

Despite these dire working conditions, Wal-Mart claims the WWJ is out to fulfil a nefarious agenda.

This isn’t really about Walmart at all,” said company spokesman Dan Fogleman. “… The union is focused on fulfilling its own agenda.”

WWJ is a “union-funded, union-backed” organization that wants more union members who pay dues that can be used by union bosses on their political agenda, Fogleman said.

WWJ spokeswoman Leah Fried responded, saying WWJ is 95 percent funded by foundations and donations, and while the union is supporting the group, so are many others.

“It’s so incredible that his response for people not getting paid for heavy, difficult labor is to say it’s just a union-backed thing,” she said. “They feel it’s somehow OK for this to go on in their warehouses.”

The action in Elwood follows a walkout of non-union workers at a large Walmart warehouse near Riverside, California, that recently ended after 15 days due to workers’ family financial problems. In These Timesjournalist David Moberg credits the Riverside workout for inspiring the Sept. 15 walkout by 30-plus workers at Wal-Mart’s huge Elwood warehouse.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

kamikazemilkman:

“When about 650 members of community, labor and faith organizations rallied today in Elwood, Illinois in support of workers at a key Walmart warehouse striking to protest “poverty wages,” sexual harassment, racial discrimination and extreme work conditions, they were met with riot-gear-clad police and the private security Illinois Law Enforcement Alarm System Mobile Field Force who surrounded them, arrested all 47 who committed civil disobedience by sitting in the road, and told the other peaceful protesters to disperse or risk “chemical or less lethal munitions being deployed.””

kamikazemilkman:

When about 650 members of community, labor and faith organizations rallied today in Elwood, Illinois in support of workers at a key Walmart warehouse striking to protest “poverty wages,” sexual harassment, racial discrimination and extreme work conditions, they were met with riot-gear-clad police and the private security Illinois Law Enforcement Alarm System Mobile Field Force who surrounded them, arrested all 47 who committed civil disobedience by sitting in the road, and told the other peaceful protesters to disperse or risk “chemical or less lethal munitions being deployed.””

(via realworldnews)

After Claudia Morain, the news service director at U.C. Davis, said only two (Officer Alexander Lee and Lt. John Pike) were able to be identified as having deployed pepper spray she told the press both would be placed on paid leave indefinitely. ‘Pepper Spray Cop's  2010 salary was reportedly over $100,000 dollars.

Also Police Chief Annette Spicuzza was put on leave. She announcing her retirement after 27 years in law enforcement and will collected her pension. She does not want the Nov. 18 incident to define her or the university, and she’s leaving so everyone involved can move forward.

Chancellor Linda Katehi apologizes for pepper spray incident but refused to resign.

The police officers’ union at the last moment attempted to block the release of the Kroll and Reynoso Reports on the grounds of the Police Officer’s Bill of Rights.
Judge Grillo wrote about his decision
There is a “strong public policy supporting transparency in government… [t]he public’s interest in the … conduct of peace officers is substantial” because “[p]eace officers “hold one of the most powerful positions in our society; our dependence on them is high and the potential for abuse of power is far from insignificant… As police officers paid by the public… to exercise authority over individual members of the public, the FUPOA cannot reasonably expect that information… will be shielded from public scrutiny… The significance overall… is that it wasn’t sufficient to just release some names when the whole goal of the Reynoso report [PDF] was to make clear to everyone that was involved, Lt. Pike did not act alone that day, and the chief of police didn’t just direct him,”

Months later Claudia Morain said “We can confirm he is no longer employed as of today… but we cannot confirm anything else because of privacy guidelines,”. A police union letter criticized the University “Additionally, the discipline recommendations did not include termination, but rather demotion or suspension. He should not have been terminated from The UC Davis Police Department.” Another letter by newly appointed Police Chief Matthew Carmichael rejected internal affairs findings saying “The needs of the department do not justify your continued employment,”

John Pike’s previous U.C. Davis $240,00 discrimination 2008 settlement might play into his termination.

These members of the police force do not work at Davis anymore HOWEVER they have all been cleared of wrongdoing by an IA investigation.

The University of California is offering to pay $30,000 to each of 21 plaintiffs who were pepper-sprayed 

The state’s higher education system would also pay a total of $250,000 to the plaintiffs’ attorneys and set aside $100,000 to pay $20,000 each to anyone who can prove he was pepper-sprayed or arrested during tuition protests in November.

The money comes from the school’s self-insured fund for system’s general liability risk program.

Cook County Judge Thomas M. Donnelly dismissed charges against 92 Occupy Chicago protesters saying the overnight park curfew violates our First Amendment.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel predicted the city will reverse the ruling, saying his administration’s enforcement of a park curfew is on “firm ground as it relates both to public safety and First Amendment rights.”

That sign, from the best I can figure, says Spain is selling like hotcakes. <3!

Pictures from RT and guardian.co.uk.

@NaomiAKlein - Well-known Canadian author and activist

This is why radical movements are mercilessly mocked. They can win. “It’s official: Quebec tuition hikes are history”

After a year of the “Maple Spring” university students across Quebec were celebrating victory following the announcement from newly elected Premier Pauline Marois that the government was cancelling the proposed tuition hike that led to the student uprising and nullifying the contentious Bill 78 law which was introduced to curb the powerful protests.

Martine Desjardins, president of the Fédération étudiante universitaire du Québec,

“It’s a total victory! … It’s a new era of collaboration instead of confrontation.”Together we’ve written a chapter in the history of Quebec,” she added. “It’s a triumph of justice and equity.”

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, a spokesperson for the Coalition large de l’association pour une solidarité syndicale étudiante (CLASSE)

Marois’ announcement followed her very first cabinet meeting and was a fulfillment of promises she made during her recent campaign against the former premier, Jean Charest.  For his part, Charest became the prime target of ire for students during their fight against the tuition hikes and following the passage of Bill 78, which he signed. The most odious sections of Bill 78, which later became Law 12, will be nullified by decree, said Marois.

The Montreal Gazette reports:

Whichever side of the debate you were on, there was no denying the significance of the moment. Marois, who was criticized by the Liberals for wearing a symbolic red square in solidarity with students for much of the conflict, made a promise to cancel the tuition increase — and she moved quickly to fulfill that commitment.

Students, who organized countless marches and clanged pots and never wavered from their goal of keeping education accessible with a tuition freeze, seemed at last to have triumphed definitively.

The various student groups, which range from the more radical CLASSE to the less strident FEUQ, do not share all the same political goals or tactics, but it is unquestionable that their shared movement helped lead to the downfall of the Charest government, paved the path for Marois victory, and culminated in yesterday’s victory.

thepeoplesrecord:

Thoughts about the future of OWS with Captain Ray Lewis

What are you expecting of OWS on September 17?
I’m expecting one hell of a turnout, and that’ll tell me that this movement is still very much alive. That’s because the problems haven’t gone away. They haven’t even dissipated slightly. It’s the same amount of corruption and subsequently I don’t see people going away. 

How do you think the movement can grow in the upcoming months?
What I’m trying to do is get this occupation to grow by getting mainstream Americans to wake up and get involved. That’s one of the reasons for my sign, which advocates everyone to watch “Inside Job,” which is about the financial crisis. Once you watch this documentary, not only will you understand Occupy, you’ll be a full-fledged advocate. 

What kind of resistance do you hope to see with the upcoming election? 
One of my big things is advocating pacifism. I don’t like any kind of violence. I don’t even like civil disobedience, in taking the streets and stopping traffic, even though I participated in that. That’s why I was arrested, but I did that to show solidarity with the young people. But we have to be careful with any action that can be interpreted by mainstream America as that can make us look like trouble makers. 

What can be learned from OWS one year later?
Everyone has learned that there’s a movement afoot. It’s here. It’s going to stay and it’s going to stay until the problems disappear and that won’t be for a while. What people don’t realize is you need to be patient. As you get older you get more patient, but the young people didn’t have the patience and wanted to see changes quicker. You have to realize this is going to be a long tour and you have to stay the course.

Ray Lewis is a retired Philadelphia police captain who was arrested last November during an OWS action in New York City. 

(via thepeoplesrecord)

thepoliticalnotebook:

It’s the anniversary of the Occupy movement, a movement which I made an effort to document over the course of this year through photography submissions from people who had witnessed or participated in rallies and protests across the US (and even across the pond, I received a few Occupy Londons, an Occupy Bristol, and even an Occupy Dublin). Above are just a handful of the photographs I collected from people. If you want to see the full collection, it’s housed here on The Political Notebook and also here on Pinterest

Here are some longreads, old and new, on Occupy, its origins and its future.

Photos: [1] Occupy Philadelphia Day 59. Eviction protests. Michael Albany. [2] Zuccotti Park. Fall 2011. Jack Massey. [3] UC Davis. Pepper spray cop. Brian Nguyen. [4] Occupy London, October 2011. Tahlia Hein. [5] Zuccotti, Fall 2011. Luis Antonio Thompson. [6] Zuccotti, Fall 2011. Bianca Farrow. [7] NYC, Fall 2011. Ceridwyn Asher. [8] Occupy Dallas, Fall 2011. Chris Wang. [9] Occupy London, November 30th. Allan Shaw.

(via realworldnews)