allabouthumansupremacy:

via Occupy Canada
http://bit.ly/U5gK7Z  Once this Alberta, Canada landscape was a pristine wilderness roamed by deer now it’s ‘the most destructive industrial project on earth’ *Lush green forests once blanketed an area of the Tar Sands at Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada, larger than England
*Area where blackened earth now stands dubbed by environmentalists as most destructive industrial project on earth *Boreal forest - once home to grizzly bears, moose and bison - is vanishing at rate second to Amazon deforestation ARTICLE/SEE THE PHOTOS: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2219240/Tar-Sands-Canada-worlds-largest-oil-reserve-173billion-untouched-barrels.html

allabouthumansupremacy:

via Occupy Canada

http://bit.ly/U5gK7Z
Once this Alberta, Canada landscape was a pristine wilderness roamed by deer now it’s ‘the most destructive industrial project on earth’

*Lush green forests once blanketed an area of the Tar Sands at Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada, larger than England

*Area where blackened earth now stands dubbed by environmentalists as most destructive industrial project on earth

*Boreal forest - once home to grizzly bears, moose and bison - is vanishing at rate second to Amazon deforestation

ARTICLE/SEE THE PHOTOS:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2219240/Tar-Sands-Canada-worlds-largest-oil-reserve-173billion-untouched-barrels.html

(Source: , via starmichael)

interesting-fact:
Wind turbines can kill bats without impact, they die because their lungs explode from a drop in air pressure. - http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14593-wind-turbines-make-bat-lungs-explode.html?feedId=online-news_rss20
—
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interesting-fact:

Wind turbines can kill bats without impact, they die because their lungs explode from a drop in air pressure. - http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14593-wind-turbines-make-bat-lungs-explode.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

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nrdc:

What Trees Mean to Communities
In a recent blog post, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities, Kaid Benfield shares a few impressive facts about trees, via the National Arbor Day Foundation and the US Forest Service:
The net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to ten room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day.
If you plant a tree today on the west side of your home, in 5 years your energy bills should be 3 percent less. In 15 years the savings will be nearly 12 percent.
One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. 
A number of studies have shown that real estate agents and home buyers assign between 10 and 23 percent of the value of a residence to the trees on the property.
Surgery patients who could see a grove of deciduous trees recuperated faster and required less pain-killing medicine than matched patients who viewed only brick walls.
In one study, stands of trees reduced particulates by 9 to 13 percent, and the amount of dust reaching the ground was 27 to 42 percent less under a stand of trees than in an open area.
Read more.
Photo: Kaid Benfield

nrdc:

What Trees Mean to Communities

In a recent blog post, NRDC’s director of sustainable communities, Kaid Benfield shares a few impressive facts about trees, via the National Arbor Day Foundation and the US Forest Service:

  • The net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to ten room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day.
  • If you plant a tree today on the west side of your home, in 5 years your energy bills should be 3 percent less. In 15 years the savings will be nearly 12 percent.
  • One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. 
  • A number of studies have shown that real estate agents and home buyers assign between 10 and 23 percent of the value of a residence to the trees on the property.
  • Surgery patients who could see a grove of deciduous trees recuperated faster and required less pain-killing medicine than matched patients who viewed only brick walls.
  • In one study, stands of trees reduced particulates by 9 to 13 percent, and the amount of dust reaching the ground was 27 to 42 percent less under a stand of trees than in an open area.

Read more.

Photo: Kaid Benfield

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

earthfixseekssalmon:

The Pebble Mine in Alaska is causing even an “ideal redneck Republican” like legislator Rick Halford to come out against it.
earthandscience:

Rick Halford is a “manifest destiny” kind of Alaskan. He cleared his land with dynamite. He calls himself the “ideal redneck Republican”. As a longtime leader in the state legislature, he never met a hard-rock mine he didn’t like.
That is, until he took a long look at the proposed Pebble Mine in south-west Alaska. It is a phenomenal prospect, the biggest and richest in North America. But to dig a mine there is to make a Faustian bargain that involves an agonizing Alaskan twist.
In return for copper and gold worth an estimated $500bn (£320bn), state and federal regulators risk poisoning what scientists describe as the last best place on earth for millions of wild salmon.
Read more @ Ripples from Pebble felt far from Alaska | Environment

earthfixseekssalmon:

The Pebble Mine in Alaska is causing even an “ideal redneck Republican” like legislator Rick Halford to come out against it.

earthandscience:

Rick Halford is a “manifest destiny” kind of Alaskan. He cleared his land with dynamite. He calls himself the “ideal redneck Republican”. As a longtime leader in the state legislature, he never met a hard-rock mine he didn’t like.

That is, until he took a long look at the proposed Pebble Mine in south-west Alaska. It is a phenomenal prospect, the biggest and richest in North America. But to dig a mine there is to make a Faustian bargain that involves an agonizing Alaskan twist.

In return for copper and gold worth an estimated $500bn (£320bn), state and federal regulators risk poisoning what scientists describe as the last best place on earth for millions of wild salmon.

Read more @ Ripples from Pebble felt far from Alaska | Environment

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

If it’s legal in soaps – and even to eat – then why can’t we grow it?


The stated reason industrial hemp is still illegal is that someone could hide marijuana plants within a field of hemp. However, The Chinese government that shoots you if you have marijuana allow tens of thousands of acres of industrial hemp, and they can tell the difference. Technically, they execute people for trafficking, not for smoking it. Still, the point is well made. The North American Industrial Hemp Council compares the difference between the two plants to the difference between corn and roses. Industrial hemp producers space their plants four inches apart, growing them as tall as 20 feet high, whereas marijuana plants are grown six feet apart in shorter, fatter bushes.

A likely explanation for the continued ban on growing industrial hemp is that the vested interests that stand to lose market share if it were allowed – the cotton and timber industries – hold enough power in D.C. to keep it illegal.

Arctic Ready and the accompanying “Let’s Go!” campaign is an elaborate hoax from Greenpeace and The Yes Lab aimed to increase awareness of Shell’s contentious plan to drill in the Arctic.

The groups have harnessed social media, online video and gaming in a full-blown assault on Shell, which plans to begin exploratory drilling in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Read more.

President Obama gave Shell the green light to start off-shore Arctic drilling in Alaska’s Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Big Oil couldn’t wait. They loaded up their drilling ships and set sail as fast as possible to make all those environmentalists eat their words. But, a Shell oil drilling ship lost its mooring and ran aground in an Alaskan harbor. The “Discoverer” is owned by Noble Corp, and is among a Shell fleet to soon head north for planned exploratory drilling in the Arctic waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas.

No damage was caused, but still. If they can’t keep the ship on course, what makes them -OR US- sure they can drill for oil in a completely foreign, frozen, deep water environment without making a more serious mistake?

jtotheizzoe:

Burning Up The Climate Record Books
328: The magic number
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released their latest “State of the Climate” report. June 2012 marks the 328th month in a row that global surface temperatures – the temperatures that affect our local climate and weather - were above average. This unfortunate proof of the “new normal” is just the latest straw on the climate camel’s back, and you really have to wonder how many more it will take before more people start to view this as the serious situation that it is.
Some other high/lowlights:
The Northern Hemisphere was more than 2˚F above normal for June, an all-time record.
Globally, June 2012 was the warmest on record (for land temps).
Ocean temperatures, whose rise is perhaps more dangerous than land (feeding extreme weather and ice melt), were at their 10th highest level on record.
There’s hope, however. A new poll from Stanford University and The Washington Post says that 6 in 10 Americans now agree that the climate is changing, and two-thirds want the U.S. to lead the world in fighting climate change. They can’t yet agree on what that means, exactly. More interesting tidbits from that poll here.
Previously: Record highs to record lows ratio at 10:1 in 2012! Ack!

jtotheizzoe:

Burning Up The Climate Record Books

328: The magic number

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released their latest “State of the Climate” report. June 2012 marks the 328th month in a row that global surface temperatures – the temperatures that affect our local climate and weather - were above average. This unfortunate proof of the “new normal” is just the latest straw on the climate camel’s back, and you really have to wonder how many more it will take before more people start to view this as the serious situation that it is.

Some other high/lowlights:

  • The Northern Hemisphere was more than 2˚F above normal for June, an all-time record.
  • Globally, June 2012 was the warmest on record (for land temps).
  • Ocean temperatures, whose rise is perhaps more dangerous than land (feeding extreme weather and ice melt), were at their 10th highest level on record.

There’s hope, however. A new poll from Stanford University and The Washington Post says that 6 in 10 Americans now agree that the climate is changing, and two-thirds want the U.S. to lead the world in fighting climate change. They can’t yet agree on what that means, exactly. More interesting tidbits from that poll here.

Previously: Record highs to record lows ratio at 10:1 in 2012! Ack!

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Actual Dr. Bruce Banner on Colbert Report talking about environmental protection and fracking. (x)

also check this out for The Avengers Documentary. 

(via stephencolberts)

Many states are prevented from imposing emergency gun controls.

In Utah, for example, a state law prohibits the state from enacting emergency bans on guns, putting Gov. Herbert in a position of instead asking county governments to issue emergency rules for outdoor gun use as wildfire conditions prevail across the West.

In North Carolina, gun rights activists have successfully fought legal battles to make sure governors can’t ban guns during emergencies

You can’t hold back the tide. Or sea level rise. There’s melting ice, of course. But H2O that’s already liquid expands as it warms—and the oceans are warming from climate change.

That sea level rise isn’t the same everywhere. The moon’s pull, oceanic currents, the Earth’s rotation—these all play a role in what ocean water is where. Turns out the U.S. East Coast is experiencing sea level rise three to four times higher than the global average, according to a study from the U.S. Geological Survey in the journal Nature Climate Change. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.)

That’s bad news for the highly populated region and suggests storm surges are going to prove ever more problematic from New York City to Cape Hatteras.

(Source: sarahlee310, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

The gelatinous skin of the WikiCell, while for the most part created from natural particles, does have some hard science in the form of biochemical polymer chitosan and alginate, or algae extract. The hard shell of the WikiCells, which protects the form and prevents breakage, is made either from bagasse, a fibrous residue from sugar cane, or from isomalt, a sweetener. WikiCells can be washed like a piece of fruit, eliminating the need for extraneous packaging.

Edwards began his work with yogurts and mousses, and has now produced his first alcoholic product in the form of the WikiCocktail, which suspends cointreau in a skin made from orange zest.

Hopefully we’ll leave mountains of trash and oil derived plastic packaging behind.