The FDA’s analysis, including 200 samples, showed average levels of 3.5 to 6.7 micrograms of inorganic per serving. Consumer Reports, with 223 samples, found levels up to 8.7 micrograms. That is roughly equivalent to one gram of in 115,000 servings of rice.

So far, officials say they have found no evidence that suggests is unsafe to eat. The agency has studied the issue for decades but is in the middle of conducting a new study of 1,200 samples of grocery-store products – short and long-grain , adult and baby cereals, drinks and even cakes – to measure levels.

Arsenic concentrates in the shells of rise. BROWN RICE has more arsenic than white rice because it contains the shells.

The best way I’ve heard to decrease the arsenic is to boil the rice as you would pasta, LOTS OF WATER, then strain when done. 

The 9 grain wheat bread might look and smell freshly baked but it contains close to 50 ingredients including refined flours, dough conditioners, hidden MSG, refined sugars, etc. Could bread this processed ever be real food? Certainly not, when it includes a chemical ingredient called azodicarbonamide, which is banned as a food additive in the U.K., Europe, and Australia, and if you get caught using it in Singapore you can get up to 15 years in prison and be fined $450,000. Azodicarbonamide is more commonly used in the production of foamed plastics, however, it is allowed in the United States as a food additive, a flour bleaching agent, and a dough conditioner that improves elasticity of bread. The U.K. has recognized this ingredient as a potential cause of asthma if inhaled, and advises against its use in people who have sensitivity to food dye allergies and other common allergies in food, because azodicarbonamide can exacerbate the symptoms. Let’s not forget it only takes 4 or 5 simple ingredients to make REAL whole-wheat bread including flour, yeast, salt, water, and maybe honey.

interesting-fact:

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