A Rediscovered 1865 Letter from a Freed Slave.

Below is Jordan Anderson’s letter in full, as it appears on lettersofnote.com. To take a look at what appears to be a scan of the original letter, which appeared in an August 22, 1865 edition of the New York Daily Tribune, click here.As Letters Of Note points out, the newspaper account makes clear that the letter was dictated.

Michael Johnson, a professor of history at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore says he has discovered evidence that the people involved in this correspondence are real, and that the letter is probably authentic.

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

thepeoplesrecord:

This is the third (and for today at least, final) set of our critics of capitlalism image series that we’ve uploaded onto our Facebook photostream featuring activists, historic figures, writers, artists & movement leaders from various backgrounds and time periods, idealogically united against capitalism.

You can see the first photoset of image quotes on tumblr here. Here is the second photo set we did on capitalism. Here is a related photoset we did on the Prison Industrial Complex and here is one we did on human rights in Palestine.

We’re nearly to 500 likes on Facebook, help our page grow there by liking and sharing our photos/page on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter (@ThePeoplesRec) & everywhere else. Thanks for your support Tumblr!

(via thepeoplesrecord)

darkjez:

Girl Holding Sign That Reads… 

SOMETHING YOUR TOUR GUIDE MIGHT NOT TELL YOU: 
The heart of NYC’s finance district is built on a huge 18th Century African Burial Ground. Some 419 Africans were discovered in 1991, a large portion women and children.
The burial ground extends form Broadway southward under City Hall, and almost to the site of the former world trade center. It is believed that there are as many as 20,000 slavery-era Africans in graves under the buildings in lower Manhattan.
Abolish historical amnesia and ponder for a moment the fact that this financial epicenter is built on slavery, oppression, and death.

darkjez:

Girl Holding Sign That Reads…

SOMETHING YOUR TOUR GUIDE MIGHT NOT TELL YOU:

The heart of NYC’s finance district is built on a huge 18th Century African Burial Ground. Some 419 Africans were discovered in 1991, a large portion women and children.

The burial ground extends form Broadway southward under City Hall, and almost to the site of the former world trade center. It is believed that there are as many as 20,000 slavery-era Africans in graves under the buildings in lower Manhattan.

Abolish historical amnesia and ponder for a moment the fact that this financial epicenter is built on slavery, oppression, and death.

(Source: faitheboss, via diaries-of-a-hypocondratic)

(Source: afriet, via xvilexxx)

Dr. Mark Craddock an Australian doctor and a member of the Exclusive Brethren Christian Fellowship sect has been banned from practicing medicine after he prescribed an 18-year-old man who was also part of the sect with a chemical castration drug after he came out as gay.

In a letter to the NSW Health Care Complaints Commission, the unnamed man, who is now 24, said that when he came out as gay, a church leader told him ”there’s medication you can go on.” He continued, ”He recommended that I speak to Dr Craddock on the matter with a view to my being placed on medication to help me with my ‘problem’,”

The teen went to visit the 75-year-old doctor who prescribed him a "gay cure": the anti-androgen therapy cyproterone acetate, brand name Cyprostat, along with five repeats, according to ninemsn. He said the doctor did not refer him to a psychologist or discuss the drug’s side effects.

Cyprostat is a form of hormone therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Hormone suppressants have been used to “chemically castrate” sex offenders, the Guardian notes.

The Medical Council of the Australian State of New South Wales determined, “Dr Craddock failed to adequately assess the patient and failed to provide appropriate medical management of the patients therapeutic needs,” in an excerpt by Gay Star News. The committee found that Craddock was guilty of “unsatisfactory processional conduct. He was severely reprimanded and practice restrictions were placed on his registration.”

There are more than 40,000 Exclusive Brethren around the world. They “believe strongly in the traditional family unit. Marriage is held in the greatest [honor], as one of God’s original thoughts of blessing for the human race.”

Other doctors have taken dangerous steps in an attempt to “cure” homosexuality. In 2010, Dr. Maria New of New York City’s Mount Sinai was reportedly experimenting with injecting fetuses with steroids to potentially make girls “more feminine” and reduce odds they turn out gay, the Oregonian reported at the time.

The American Psychiatric Association has condemned the “treatment” of homosexuality. So has GLAAD saying, “The potential risks of ‘reparative therapy’ are great, including depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior, since therapist alignment with societal prejudices against homosexuality may reinforce self-hatred already experienced by the patient.”

Activists have championed against “gay cures” in the United Kingdom, which includes Conversion Therapy. Last year, Apple pulled Exodus International’s “Gay Cure” app from its collection.

Click through for 11 horrific “cures” for homosexuality.

knowledgefordummies:

- The story of HORUS & JESUS

knowledgefordummies:

- The story of HORUS & JESUS

masteradept:

nigeriantomboy:

Wow.

This would be better than the faces that adorn it.

masteradept:

nigeriantomboy:

Wow.

This would be better than the faces that adorn it.

(Source: cierraraelyn, via vivelavapeur)

atheist-overdose:

The progression of christianityfollow for the best atheist posts on tumblr

The Tea Party says slavery makes the founding fathers look bad and want it removed — almost entirely.

They are asking lawmakers to change state law saying “no portrayal of minority experience in the history which actually occurred shall obscure the experience or contributions of the Founding Fathers, or the majority of citizens, including those who reached positions of leadership.”

Now we are ignoring American history so founding fathers don’t look bad?

In 2010, the conservatives who controlled the Texas Board of Education made radical changes to the history curriculum by proposing that textbooks refer to the slave trade as the “Atlantic triangular trade”, referring to the country’s first black president as “Barack Hussein Obama,” and requiring students to “contrast” Confederate President Jefferson Davis’ inaugural address with Abraham Lincoln’s philosophical views.

So are we not suppose to know that many of America’s first leaders, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, owned slaves? Thomas Jefferson fathered children with his slave Sally Hemings, and James Madison brought a slave with him to the White House. Or that while writing the Constitution the framers avoided addressing the issue of slavery by included a compromise that each slave counted as three-fifths of a person for the purposes of representation and taxation.

Making further steps to white wash history Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN), founder of the congressional Tea Party caucus, famously said that the founders “worked tirelessly” to end slavery. GOP candidates have even signed a pledge that claimed that blacks were better off under slavery than under President Obama.

ME —-> YOU FUCKING PEOPLE ARE DISGUSTING.

todayinlaborhistory:

Today in labor history, July 8, 1966:  International Association of Machinists (IAM) members across the country employed by five airlines go on strike.  For 43 days during the peak of the summer travel season, 60 percent of the U.S. commercial airline industry was shut down as 35,000 workers stayed out on the largest strike in airline history.

todayinlaborhistory:

Today in labor history, July 8, 1966:  International Association of Machinists (IAM) members across the country employed by five airlines go on strike.  For 43 days during the peak of the summer travel season, 60 percent of the U.S. commercial airline industry was shut down as 35,000 workers stayed out on the largest strike in airline history.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Tags: union history

1908
Great unrest and critical debate was occurring amongst women. Women’s oppression and inequality was spurring women to become more vocal and active in campaigning for change. Then in 1908, 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter hours, better pay and voting rights.

1909
In accordance with a declaration by the Socialist Party of America, the first National Woman’s Day (NWD) was observed across the United States on 28 February. Women continued to celebrate NWD on the last Sunday of February until 1913.

1910
n 1910 a second International Conference of Working Women was held in Copenhagen. A woman named a Clara Zetkin (Leader of the ‘Women’s Office’ for the Social Democratic Party in Germany) tabled the idea of an International Women’s Day. She proposed that every year in every country there should be a celebration on the same day - a Women’s Day - to press for their demands. The conference of over 100 women from 17 countries, representing unions, socialist parties, working women’s clubs, and including the first three women elected to the Finnish parliament, greeted Zetkin’s suggestion with unanimous approval and thus International Women’s Day was the result.

1911
Following the decision agreed at Copenhagen in 1911, International Women’s Day (IWD) was honoured the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on 19 March. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. However less than a week later on 25 March, the tragic ‘Triangle Fire’ in New York City took the lives of more than 140 working women, most of them Italian and Jewish immigrants. This disastrous event drew significant attention to working conditions and labour legislation in the United States that became a focus of subsequent International Women’s Day events. 1911 also saw women’s ‘Bread and Roses' campaign.
 

1913-1914
On the eve of World War I campaigning for peace, Russian women observed their first International Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February 1913. In 1913 following discussions, International Women’s Day was transferred to 8 March and this day has remained the global date for International Wommen’s Day ever since. In 1914 further women across Europe held rallies to campaign against the war and to express women’s solidarity.

1917
On the last Sunday of February, Russian women began a strike for “bread and peace” in response to the death over 2 million Russian soldiers in war. Opposed by political leaders the women continued to strike until four days later the Czar was forced to abdicate and the provisional Government granted women the right to vote. The date the women’s strike commenced was Sunday 23 February on the Julian calendar then in use in Russia. This day on the Gregorian calendar in use elsewhere was 8 March.

1918 - 1999
Since its birth in the socialist movement, International Women’s Day has grown to become a global day of recognition and celebration across developed and developing countries alike. For decades, IWD has grown from strength to strength annually. For many years the United Nations has held an annual IWD conference to coordinate international efforts for women’s rights and participation in social, political and economic processes. 1975 was designated as 'International Women's Year' by the United Nations. Women's organisations and governments around the world have also observed IWD annually on 8 March by holding large-scale events that honour women's advancement and while diligently reminding of the continued vigilance and action required to ensure that women's equality is gained and maintained in all aspects of life.

2000 and beyond
IWD is now an official holiday in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China (for women only), Cuba, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Eritrea, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Madagascar (for women only), Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Nepal (for women only), Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Zambia. The tradition sees men honouring their mothers, wives, girlfriends, colleagues, etc with flowers and small gifts. In some countries IWD has the equivalent status of Mother’s Day where children give small presents to their mothers and grandmothers.

Tags: women history

Andrea Smith, Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Police officers in Saskatoon took a Native man, Darrell Night, put him in a police car, drove him far from the city’s downtown, and dropped him off to walk home in freezing weather after taking away his coat. He survived, and on telling his story, it came out that police officers had regularly taken Native people out into the cold with no warm clothing, leaving them to freeze. The police would then blame their deaths on alcohol. Two other young aboriginal men did not survive such incidents — their bodies were found separately in the same area where Darrell Night was dropped off.

Hatchen and Munson: These two drove Darrell Night to the edge of Saskatoon on a freezing January night in 2000. They were found guilty of unlawful confinement, did some time and are acknowledged by the Saskatoon Police Service for each having served for 17 years. The Police Association stood by them and paid for their defence until they were convicted. Only then were they fired.

Darrel Night’s experiences were documented in Tasha Hubbard's 2004 National Film Board of Canadadocumentary Two Worlds Colliding, winner of the Canada Award. A fictional incident was also portrayed in the half-hour drama Out In The Cold, directed by Colleen Murphy and starring Gordon Tootoosis.[

dynamicafrica:

THIS DAY IN HISTORY: On June 17th, 1991, South Africa’s Apartheid laws were repealed.
For almost 350 years, Black people in South Africa had been subject to exceedingly unjust laws designed, firstly to subjugate them and incorporate their lands into the British Empire, and secondly to turn them in labour reserves that ensured privilege to a White minority.  
The vote on 17 June 1991 that repealed the legal framework of Apartheid and began the process that would eventually abolish Apartheid as a whole was bitterly contested as many members of the White electorate sought to cling to the privileges afforded to them under Apartheid.
The legal framework in question,  consisting of four  Acts, namely, the Population Registration Act of 1950, The Group Areas Act, the Land Act and the Separate Amenities Act.
The repealing of these Acts did not include extending the right to vote to all of South Africa’s citizens. FW de Klerk, who was President at the time, committed himself to this eventuality as soon as a new constitution was drafted. This process culminated in the first democratic elections in 1994, with Nelson Mandela as the first Black President.
The repeal of the legal framework was the result of unified opposition by people from all over the world, who collectively put pressure on the Apartheid government, lobbied for sanctions, and supported the work of the liberation movements and civil society in exposing the evils of the Apartheid system.  
(source)

dynamicafrica:

THIS DAY IN HISTORY: On June 17th, 1991, South Africa’s Apartheid laws were repealed.

For almost 350 years, Black people in South Africa had been subject to exceedingly unjust laws designed, firstly to subjugate them and incorporate their lands into the British Empire, and secondly to turn them in labour reserves that ensured privilege to a White minority.  

The vote on 17 June 1991 that repealed the legal framework of Apartheid and began the process that would eventually abolish Apartheid as a whole was bitterly contested as many members of the White electorate sought to cling to the privileges afforded to them under Apartheid.

The legal framework in question,  consisting of four  Acts, namely, the Population Registration Act of 1950, The Group Areas Act, the Land Act and the Separate Amenities Act.

The repealing of these Acts did not include extending the right to vote to all of South Africa’s citizens. FW de Klerk, who was President at the time, committed himself to this eventuality as soon as a new constitution was drafted. This process culminated in the first democratic elections in 1994, with Nelson Mandela as the first Black President.

The repeal of the legal framework was the result of unified opposition by people from all over the world, who collectively put pressure on the Apartheid government, lobbied for sanctions, and supported the work of the liberation movements and civil society in exposing the evils of the Apartheid system.  

(source)

(via liberallyinclined)

wilwheaton:

The White House received a truly remarkable amount of warnings that al-Qaida was trying to attack the United States. From June to September 2001, a full seven CIA Senior Intelligence Briefs detailed that attacks were imminent, an incredible amount of information from one intelligence agency. One from June called “Bin-Ladin and Associates Making Near-Term Threats” writes that “[redacted] expects Usama Bin Laden to launch multiple attacks over the coming days.” The famous August brief called “Bin Ladin Determined to Strike the US” is included. “Al-Qai’da members, including some US citizens, have resided in or travelled to the US for years, and the group apparently maintains a support structure here,” it says. During the entire month of August, President Bush was on vacation at his ranch in Texas — which tied with one of Richard Nixon’s as the longest vacation ever taken by a president. CIA Director George Tenet has said he didn’t speak to Bush once that month, describing the president as being “on leave.” Bush did not hold a Principals’ meeting on terrorism until September 4, 2001, having downgraded the meetings to a deputies’ meeting, which then-counterterrorism czar Richard Clarke has repeatedly said slowed down anti-Bin Laden efforts “enormously, by months.”

Consider this, though: all the laws passed in the aftermath of 9/11, including the PATRIOT Act, that we were told were absolutely necessary to save us from The Terrorists™ just aren’t. The system was working the way it was supposed to work, and the 9/11 plot should have been stopped.

(via zombiesarejerks)

sonofbaldwin:

Know Your History. (Shout out to the Anti Intellect Blog)

sonofbaldwin:

Know Your History. (Shout out to the Anti Intellect Blog)

(via bunnybundy)