"There have been 694 proposed abortion restriction provisions in the first three months of 2013 alone."

image

Guttmacher Institute, via ThinkProgress (via actualfactsaboutabortion)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

The bipartisan proposal “ends Too Big To Fail subsidies or funding advantages for Wall Street mega-banks with more than $500 billion in assets.”

In order to stop the financial bleeding, the U.S. government voted to rescue the big banks rather than allow them to fail and take our economy with them. Ever since, big banks have only gotten bigger on the premise that if they fail again, the government will bail them out.

But an amendment was offered as an attachment to the Senate budget bill and it received unanimous support; 99-0. The U.S. Senate voted to strip “too big to fail” banks of the taxpayer subsidies.

Two reports indicate that the banks were rolling in taxpayer dollars that they didn’t need. In February, Bloomberg News reported that the banks made an estimated $83 billion a year. But that number could be even higher. In March top banking analyst, Chris Whalen estimated that big banks rake in more than $780 billion of government subsidies every year. Banks have been making trillions of dollars over the last few years even though they didn’t need the money.

Now it falls to the House Republicans to approve the bill and send it to the President. Considering the conservative obsession with forcing the Ryan Budget upon America, passage of the Senate bill looks grim. Now would the time for everyone to get on the phone with their representative in Congress to demand passage of the Senate budget.

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant signed a bill requiring public schools in our state to develop policies under which students will be permitted to pray at sports events, school assemblies, and even over school intercom systems. Bill, HB 638, was passed under the guise of protecting students’ religious freedom; however, it is an effort to bypass Engel v. Vitale and Abington School District v. Schempp, returning to the days before 1962 when prayer in school was inescapable.

The law was written to bypass the prohibition on formal school-sanctioned prayer. It does so by permitting students to deliver public prayers as long as they are accompanied by some sort of disclaimer from the school. But students and teachers have always had the right to pray in school, and is commonly exercised in Mississippi. What they have not had the right to do is impose their religious views on others.

David Silverman, the president of American Atheistsreferred to the legislation as “an overt act of hostility against minority religious beliefs and atheists, disguised as religious freedom.” Implementing this law will further marginalize atheists and religious minorities.

American Civil Liberties UnionFreedom From Religion Foundation, and Americans United for Separation of Church and State are widely expected to fight this new legislation, which takes effect on July 1. These groups will need complaints in order to act, which include letters attempting to educate state officials on the law. It seems unlikely that school officials will give in to the pressure from these groups. This means that it might take the family of a child adversely affected by the law being willing to come forward as a plaintiff. Unfortunately, children will have to be harmed and complaints filed before real work can happen. 

As the world waited for white smoke the Women’s Ordination Conference were in Rome with the women’s ordination worldwide. They were raising pink smoke to bring attention to the lack of women’s voices in the conclave and in the decision making of the Roman Catholic Church.

The Vatican is very much a monarchy, and has a seat at the U.N.; they make very important decisions that affect women on a global level. It’s more than a religion; it’s a government that affects the lives of millions of Catholic women around the world. Not just women who seek larger roles like ordination, girls who want to serve at the altar, women who’ve been divorced, lesbian women, reproductive healthcare, birth control, LGTB issues… They were against the Violence Against Women Act.

In 1994, Pope John Paul II closed officially any discussion on women’s ordination. People can be fired for discussing it. Lets hope is Pope Francis will open the doors just to discuss it.

A documentary film called Pink Smoke Over the Vatican is about the controversial movement of women seeking to be ordained as priests in the Roman Catholic Church.

justinspoliticalcorner:

(Crooks and Liars: NRA ‘A’ Rating Now a Scarlet Letter)

Rachel Maddow detailed the surprising dynamic going on in a Democratic primary in Illinois where a former congresswoman likely won’t win because of her vocal support of the gun nuts lobby, even to the point of channelling Wayne LaPierre with her [gun laws] “always hurt law-abiding citizens” crap from a 2010 YouTube video for a Second Amendment Freedom Rally in Chicago.

For her part, Halvorson blames outside groups like Bloomberg’s PAC for trying to buy a congressional seat. Halvorson even claims she’s still the frontrunner, seemingly oblivious to her fate. Or perhaps she figures she’ll land a gig at Fox News slamming Democrats anyway, as evidenced by this segment with Megyn Kelly last week.

This makes me crazy. Why can’t we be reasonable? I, personally, hate guns. But I don’t want to take them away from anyone who is responsible and mentally sound. I don’t understand… 

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

plannedparenthood:

The pro-choice and pro-life labels don’t reflect the complexity of the conversation about abortion. Don’t let the labels box you in.


insanepoet9:


motherfuckingjonbro:


wretchedoftheearth:


str8creme:


did-you-kno:


Source


SMH


as well as saying that we need to “get over our love affair with the fetus and start worrying about children”. sigh.


Truth hurts, doesn’t it America?


The US is one of the strangest countries when it comes to sex. Hypersexualization is ubiquitous as fuck but the act of sex, or even of talking about it is so clouded in mystery and taboo. It’s really weird. 


ohey a didyoukno that is *actually true*!  i saw this amazing woman (dr. joycelyn elders) speak on this last year.  it was one of the best talks i’ve ever seen live.

insanepoet9:

motherfuckingjonbro:

wretchedoftheearth:

str8creme:

as well as saying that we need to “get over our love affair with the fetus and start worrying about children”. sigh.

Truth hurts, doesn’t it America?

The US is one of the strangest countries when it comes to sex. Hypersexualization is ubiquitous as fuck but the act of sex, or even of talking about it is so clouded in mystery and taboo. It’s really weird. 

ohey a didyoukno that is *actually true*!  i saw this amazing woman (dr. joycelyn elders) speak on this last year.  it was one of the best talks i’ve ever seen live.

(via macaroni-overlord)

 

CONSTITUENT: My question is regarding the guns and is Washington at all aware of the psychotropic drugs that these children are taking? I guarantee it 100 percent that’s our big problem. […]

LANKFORD: I agree with that. I think there’s a bunch of issues that, quite frankly, most liberals are afraid to talk about. […] Where are we on all those psychiatric drugs? We’ve overmedicated kids. Quite frankly some of the overmedication of kids are because welfare moms want to get additional benefits and if they can put them on SSI through maintenance drugs, they can also put them on Social Security disability and get a separate check. That is wrong on every single level. Not only is it fraudulent to the government, but it also tells a kid with great potential, “don’t try because you’re disabled.”

Besides being a ridiculous comment from another house republican I want to point out many children do have disabilities and, thankfully, most have access to intervention that allows them to reach their potential. IMO its shameful to pass the blame from a lucrative issue to a sensitive and underfunded one.

Stripped to essentials, the fiscal cliff is a device constructed to force a rollback of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, as the price of avoiding tax increases and disruptive cuts in federal civilian programs and in the military. It was policy-making by hostage-taking, timed for the lame duck session, a contrived crisis, the plain idea now unfolding was to force a stampede.

First, is there a looming crisis of debt or deficits, such that sacrifices in general are necessary?  No.

Second, is there a looming crisis of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, such that these programs must be reformed?  No.

Third,  would the military sequestration programmed to start in January be a disaster?  No.

Fourth, would the upper-end tax increases programmed to take effect in January be a disaster?  No.

Fifth, would the middle-class tax increases, end of unemployment insurance and the abrupt end of the payroll tax holiday programmed for the end of January risk cutting into the main lines of consumer spending, business profits and economic growth?  Yes.

Sixth, what about all the other cuts in discretionary federal spending? Yes.

(Source: azspot, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

thepeoplesrecord:

This is the third (and for today at least, final) set of our critics of capitlalism image series that we’ve uploaded onto our Facebook photostream featuring activists, historic figures, writers, artists & movement leaders from various backgrounds and time periods, idealogically united against capitalism.

You can see the first photoset of image quotes on tumblr here. Here is the second photo set we did on capitalism. Here is a related photoset we did on the Prison Industrial Complex and here is one we did on human rights in Palestine.

We’re nearly to 500 likes on Facebook, help our page grow there by liking and sharing our photos/page on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter (@ThePeoplesRec) & everywhere else. Thanks for your support Tumblr!

(via thepeoplesrecord)

recall-all-republicans-2012:

“Corporations are people, my friend… of course they are. Everything corporations earn ultimately goes to the people. Where do you think it goes? Whose pockets? Whose pockets? People’s pockets. Human beings, my friend.” —Mitt Romney to a heckler at the Iowa State Fair who suggested that taxes should be raised on corporations as part of balancing the budget (August 2011)
“I should tell my story. I’m also unemployed.” —Mitt Romney, speaking in 2011 to unemployed people in Florida. Romney’s net worth is over $200 million. And that’s just the income we know about, since Mitt Romney won’t release his tax returns. Some say Romney may be worth as much as one billion dollars.
 

recall-all-republicans-2012:

“Corporations are people, my friend… of course they are. Everything corporations earn ultimately goes to the people. Where do you think it goes? Whose pockets? Whose pockets? People’s pockets. Human beings, my friend.” —Mitt Romney to a heckler at the Iowa State Fair who suggested that taxes should be raised on corporations as part of balancing the budget (August 2011)

“I should tell my story. I’m also unemployed.” —Mitt Romney, speaking in 2011 to unemployed people in Florida. Romney’s net worth is over $200 million. And that’s just the income we know about, since Mitt Romney won’t release his tax returns. Some say Romney may be worth as much as one billion dollars.

 

(Source: recall-all-republicans, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

Is Koch PAC Non-Partisan, As They Claim?

Much has been written about the owners of Koch Industries, brothers David H. Koch and Charles G. Koch, trying to control the political process through hundreds of millions of dollars in donations to right-wing causes and candidates.

In a voter information packet the Koch Industries corporate leadership informed tens of thousands of employees at its subsidiary, Georgia Pacific, that their livelihood could depend on the 2012 election and that the company supports Mitt Romney for president.

The packet arrived in the mailboxes of all 45,000 Georgia Pacific employees earlier this month. The cover letter [PDF], by Koch Industries President and Chief Operating Officer Dave Robertson, read:

While we are typically told before each Presidential election that it is important and historic, I believe the upcoming election will determine what kind of America future generations will inherit.

If we elect candidates who want to spend hundreds of billions in borrowed money on costly new subsidies for a few favored cronies, put unprecedented regulatory burdens on businesses, prevent or delay important new construction projects, and excessively hinder free trade, then many of our more than 50,000 U.S. employees and contractors may suffer the consequences, including higher gasoline prices, runaway inflation, and other ills.

Enclosed with the letter was a flyer [PDF] listing Koch-endorsed candidates, beginning with Romney. Robertson’s letter explained: “At the request of many employees, we have also provided a list of candidates in your state that have been supported by Koch companies or by KOCHPAC, our employee political action committee.”

The packet also included an anti-Obama editorial by Charles Koch [PDF] and a pro-Romney editorial by David Koch [PDF]. The letter went on to say, “We believe any decision about which candidates to support is—as always—yours and yours alone, based on the factors that are most important to you. Second, we do not support candidates based on their political affiliation.”

In the flyer sent to Oregon employees, all 14 Koch-backed state candidates were Republicans.

In September, a number of unionized employees at Georgia Pacific’s Toledo, Ore. plant posed for a photo in front of their union hall with Democratic state Senate candidate Arnie Roblan. When the Koch Industries voter information packet arrived in the workers’ mailboxes a few weeks later, they saw that Roblan was not on the list of Koch-endorsed candidates in Oregon. Then the AWPPW Vice President Greg Pallesen started receiving phone calls from workers. The union workers in the photo were worried that they might be fired from their jobs if the image got out on the Internet, because in the backdrop of the photo, the Georgia Pacific plant could be seen.

Their fear comes not only from the mailing, but also from a new Georgia Pacific social media policy [PDF] implemented earlier this year that warns, “Even if your social media conduct is outside of the workplace and/or non-work related, it must not reflect negatively on GP’s reputation, its products, or its brands.” Given the policy, the workers were scared to appear next to a candidate the Kochs do not support with the plant in the background.

More —> 10 Shocking Facts on the Kochs.

In a Democracy Now interview Amy Goodman and Nermeen Shaikh talk to George Farah. He explains how the contract was revealed by Time’s Mark Halperin who managed to get a copy of the contract and that it wasn’t by virtue of the commission operating with transparency.

George Farah was on DN before talking about the Commission on Presidential Debates and how we came to this point in electoral politics.

Mike McCurry, the former press secretary to President Bill Clinton, and a co-chairs of the Commission on Presidential Debates repeatedly denied the very existence of this contract. When confronted the executive director of the commission, Janet Brown, about the existence of a contract that’s dictating the terms of the debates, she said there is no such contract, the commission is not a party to it. Once some of the features of the contract started to come out, the commission said the contract is only about podium heights and temperatures in the auditoriums and whether the candidates can wear risers in their shoes, but denied that there was any substance.
Now that we’re actually seeing the contract, we’re seeing there are extraordinary restrictions preventing there from being more unpredictable questions. We’re seeing the exclusion of all third-party voices according to the candidate selection criteria. And we’re seeing the prohibition on additional debates…

deadcrackerstorage:

Perfect.